Sunday Guided Tour -  Fifth Sunday after Pentecost   - July 5 , 20120

        Here is the link to this weeks worship service 

        Read the text below at your leisure or follow along with Rev. Jim McKnight and and Rick Young, Music Director.

 

https://youtu.be/rsmwrhQ2wJg

        You can also access this at Facebook : Friends of TrinityUnitedChurchThorold.

Good morning, everyone, and welcome to our Sunday Guided Tour for July 5th.  This is the first Sunday of our summer season, and so we celebrate the friendship and relationship that unite the congregations of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian and Trinity United.  It’s certainly a new time and circumstance for us, especially as the first summer Sunday in eleven years without Rev. Ken MacQuarrie.  I suspect both we and Ken miss each other.  But the message that is life is Gospel, and the Gospel strong assurance is that God is with us, through every season and the changes in our lives.  And so we can be confident and thankful, and share our hopes and dreams and prayers as faithful people.

Today, as well, we’re right in the middle of the Independence Day celebrations of our neighbours to the south.  And so we share our hopes and prayers with them, that their days to come will hold the promise of healing and new life, and of a union truly made more perfect.  

 

Please join with me as we begin today’s service with prayer:

Loving God, we come together here in spirit and in word, and through the favours that are Internet and camera.  We thank you we can focus on a place of faith and sanctuary, of prayer and song and of community together  -  heart-to-heart and hand-to-hand, and knowing you are with us and among us.  Help us always to recall the promise of the Saint, who says to us that there is nothing in all Creation that can separate us from each other in your love through Jesus Christ, our Lord.  Hold us close together in this moment in your love, and take us with you as you walk the way of justice and of peace for all the world.  We pray in Jesus’ name, for Jesus’ sake.  Amen.

 

Come, Let Us Sing. Hymn #222

1       Come, let us sing to the Lord our song,

        we have stood silently too long;

        surely the Lord deserves our praise,

        so joyfully thank God for our days.

 

2      O thirsty soul, come drink at the well;

        God's living waters will never fail.

        Surely the Lord will help you to stand,

        strengthened and comforted by God's hand.
 

3      You dwell among us and cause us to pray,

        and walk with each other following your way;

        our precious brothers and sisters will grow

        in the fulfilling love they know.

 

4      Deserts shall bloom and mountains shall sing

        to the desire of all living things.

        Come, all you creatures, high and low,

        let your praises endlessly flow.

 

As has been the custom for what we are calling our Sunday Guided Tours at Trinity, we are going to examine the lectionary readings assigned for this particular Sunday in the calendar of the Church Year.  We will try to discern the themes that might connect them, and then consider how the other readings serve to help interpret the reading from the Gospel.  Recently, I’ve found myself getting caught up a little bit with the readings from the likes of the Book of Genesis, because the authors are such masterful story-tellers.  The stories are irresistible.  My concern, though, is that I might have been giving short shrift to the readings from the Gospel.  So for today, I thought I’d examine the Gospel reading first.  

 

I have to tell you, I’m afraid I was disappointed.  The Gospel reading sometimes is a parable, or manageable story like the five loaves and two fishes.  But this Sunday’s reading wasn’t anything like that at all.  It was chopped in two.  The two sections didn’t seem to have anything to do with one another; and what seemed to be the connecting theme of John the Baptist was entirely omitted.  I started to despair.  I’m going to ask Rick if he would please read the Gospel passage for today so you can have a better idea of what I’m talking about.

 

As we prepare to hear the Bible that are ours this morning, I invite you to share with me the Prayer for Illumination.  Let us pray:

Gracious Holy Spirit, we pray you guide us in your love and strength of soul and heart, that we might clearly hear the promise of the Gospel and live our lives for Jesus’ sake.  We pray in Jesus’ name.  Amen.

 

[Rick:]

Matthew 11:16-19, 25-30  (New International and King James Versions)

16    “To what can I compare this generation?  They are like children sitting in the marketplaces and calling  

        out to others:

17.    “We played the pipe for you,
         and you did not dance;
         we sang a dirge,
         and you did not mourn.’

18     For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, ‘He has a demon.’

19.    The Son of Man came eating and drinking, and they say, ‘Here is a glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax                      collectors and sinners.’ But wisdom is proved right by her deeds.”  [God's wisdom, however, is shown to be                 true by its results. (GNT)]

 

25     At that time Jesus said, “I praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things              from the wise and learned, and revealed them to little children.

26    Yes, Father, for this is what you were pleased to do.

27     “All things have been committed to me by my Father.  No one knows the Son except the Father, and no one                  knows the Father except the Son and those to whom the Son chooses to reveal him.

28    Come unto me, all you that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.

29    Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and you shall find rest unto

        your souls.

30    For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.

 

Will You Come and Follow Me, verses 1, 2 and 4. Hymn #567

1       Will you come and follow me

         if I but call your name?

        Will you go where you don't know

        and never be the same?

        Will you let my love be shown,

        will you let my name be known,

        will you let my life be grown

        in you and you in me?

 

2      Will you leave yourself behind

        if I but call your name?

        Will you care for cruel and kind

        and never be the same?

        Will you risk the hostile stare

        should your life attract or scare?

        Will you let me answer prayer

        in you and you in me?

 

4      Will you love the 'you' you hide

        if I but call your name?

        Will you quell the fear inside

        and never be the same?

        Will you use the faith you've found

        to reshape the world around,

        through my sight and touch and sound

        in you and you in me?

 

As I say, when I first heard the passage Rick just read to us, I started to despair.  Especially when I read the chapter that contained it and realized the overarching story about John the Baptist had been totally omitted.  It certainly raised the question for me about how the composers of the lectionary come up with the verses that they do.  And then an old thought came to mind for me: if you read the Bible, and I read the Bible, and if I despair, then maybe you’ll despair as well, so we may as well despair together, and try to work the whole thing out.  And as I have said, one of the ways we can do that is by referring to the other Bible readings for the day and consider how they might help us interpret the reading from the Gospel.  So that’s exactly what I did.  I referred to the other Bible readings for the day.  And in the spirit of our Sunday Guided Tours, I invite you (in fact, I ask you) to read them too.  All the readings for today are posted on both the Trinity and St. Andrew’s websites.  

 

Well, at first consideration, those readings didn’t seem to be much help themselves.  The reading from Genesis was chopped up into three parts; the psalm was called “A song for the anointed ruler”; the alternate, from the Song of Solomon (in the Jewish Bible called the Song of Songs) was entitled as a “love song”; and the Epistle reading from Paul’s letter to the Church in Rome had ascribed to it the title: I do not do the good I want to do.  Good grief!   There didn’t seem to be among the readings any connection whatsoever.  What on earth were the composers of the lectionary thinking?  How could the other readings possibly be of help in interpreting the Gospel for the day?  But I knew there had to be some reason.  There had to be some connection.  So I hunkered down, and started to examine.

 

The reading from Genesis is, of course, a story that’s a gem.  It’s the story about the servant of Abraham and Sarah searching out a proper partner for their one and only son, Isaac.  It’s a fabulous story, constituting the longest chapter in the Book of Genesis.  There are intricacies and connections we can only begin to appreciate but, in its essence, it turns out to be a love story.

 

Here is what the authors tell us:

Genesis 24:34-38, 42-49, 58-67 (Jewish Study Bible)

34    [To Rebekah and her brother, Laban,] the man [who had met Rebekah at the wellspring] said, “I am

        Abraham’s servant.

35     The Lord has greatly blessed my master, and he has become rich: the Lord has given him sheep and cattle,                 silver and gold, male and female slaves, camels and donkeys.

36    And Sarah, my master’s wife, bore my master a son in her old age, and he has assigned to him everything

        he owns.

37.    Now my master made me swear, saying, ‘You shall not get a wife for my son from the daughters of the                           Canaanites, in whose land I dwell;

38     but you shall go to my father’s house, to my kindred, and get a wife for my son.’ 

 42.  “I came today to the wellspring, and I said, ‘O Lord, God of my master Abraham, if you would indeed grant                    success to the errand on which I am engaged!

43     As I stand by the spring of water, let the young woman who comes out to draw and to whom I say, “Please, let             me drink a little water from your jar,”

44    and who answers, “You may drink, and I will also draw for your camels”—let her be the wife whom the Lord

        has decreed for my master’s son.’

45    “I had scarcely finished praying in my heart, when Rebekah came out with her jar on her shoulder, and went                down to the spring and drew.  And I said to her, ‘Please give me a drink.’

46    She quickly lowered her jar  and said, ‘Drink, and I will also water your camels.’  So I drank, and she also                     watered the camels.

47     I inquired of her, ‘Whose daughter are you?’ And she said, ‘The daughter of Bethuel, son of Nahor son, whom             Milcah bore to him.’  And I put the ring on her nose, and the bands on her arms.

48    Then I bowed low in homage to the Lord, and blessed the Lord, the God of my master Abraham, who led me on         the right way to get the daughter of my master’s brother for his son.

49    And now, if you mean to treat my master with true kindness, tell me; and if not, tell me also, that I may turn               right or left.”

 

58    They called Rebekah and said to her, “Will you go with this man?”  And she said, “I will.”

59     So they sent off their sister Rebekah and her nurse along with Abraham’s servant and his men.

60    And they blessed Rebekah and said to her, "O sister!
        May you grow into thousands of myriads;
        may your offspring seize. 
         the gates of their foes.”

61     Then Rebekah and her maids arose, mounted the camels, and followed the man.  So the servant took Rebekah,           and went his way.

62    Isaac had just come back from the vicinity of Beer-lahai-roi, for he was settled in the region of the Negeb.

63    And Isaac went out walking in the field toward evening and, looking up, he saw camels approaching.

64    Raising her eyes, Rebekah saw Isaac.  She alighted from the camel,

65     and said to the servant, “Who is that man walking in the field toward us?”  And the servant said, “It is my                     master.” So she took her veil and covered herself.

66    The servant told Isaac all the things that he had done.

67     Isaac then brought her into the tent of his mother Sarah, and he took Rebekah as his wife.  Isaac loved her, and         thus found comfort after his mother’s death.

 

After all the machinations and the customs of the day, we read:

Isaac loved Rebekah, and thus found comfort after his mother’s death.

 

And, as it turns out, the theme of love is the same one that shapes writing of the psalm.  For us, in our Christian context, the psalm has been entitled: A song for the anointed ruler; but, in fact, the psalm was originally characterized by its actual author, and assigned a heading as its first verse that reads:  For the leader; on shoshannim.  Of the Korahites.  A maskil.  A love song.  In the Jewish Bible, shoshannim, interpreted as lilies, predominate in The Song of Songs, and are seen as erotic.   So, such reference in the psalm contributes to its interpretation as a love song, and serves to connect us further with the third reading for today, our reading from the Song of Songs, which contains the words:

 

8      Listen!  My beloved!
        Look!  Here he comes,
        leaping across the mountains,
        bounding over the hills.
9      My beloved is like a gazelle or a young stag.
        Look!  There he stands behind our wall,
        gazing through the windows,
        peering through the lattice.
10     My beloved spoke and said to me,
        “Arise, my darling,
          my beautiful one, come with me.

 

Ministry of Music  -  Now Thank We All Our God
 

The readings that accompany the gospel reading for today seem to urge us to approach the gospel through the lens of love.  That would make good sense.  I mean the message of the Gospel, the Good News of the Gospel, surely has been shaped by love, and provides a promised that is love.  

 

But then, in the middle of all of this, we have the reading from Paul’s letter to the Church in Rome.  It seems to ruin everything.  It seems to knock us right off track and require that we think of sin, and spirit over flesh and body, and so distract us and drag us down.

 

The reading itself is actually quite a lot of fun to listen to, to hear; but the message, at first blush, seems pretty dismal.  This is what Paul writes:

 

15     I do not understand my own actions.  For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate.

16     Now if I do what I do not want, I agree that the law is good.

17     So then it is no longer I that do it, but sin which dwells within me.

18     For I know that nothing good dwells within me, that is, in my flesh.  I can will what is right, but I cannot do it. 19     For I do not do the good I want, but the evil I do not want is what I do.

20     Now if I do what I do not want, it is no longer I that do it, but sin which dwells within me.

21      So I find it to be a law that when I want to do right, evil lies close at hand.

22     For I delight in the law of God, in my inmost self,

23     but I see another law at work in me, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the              law of sin at work within me.    

24    What a wretched man I am!  Who will deliver me from this body of death?

25     Thanks be to God, who delivers me through Jesus Christ our Lord! 

 

So here we have it:  readings that are love, and love, and love .. and then a letter of confusion and of tension and despair.  We might just feel a bit undone ourselves, and once more searching for the hope and Good News of the Gospel.  But as we think about it, as we ponder, we might discover that it’s all right there before us in Paul’s words.  

Paul himself gives the help and hope we need. 

 

20    Now if I do what I do not want, says Paul, it is no longer I that do it, but sin which dwells within me.

 

But what if Paul finds himself doing the good he thought he could not do, not because of the sin which dwells within him, but the grace?!  What if it’s grace, and not the law, that shapes his actions.   What if it’s the grace of Christ, the grace we pray for every Sunday, maybe every day, that cannot be denied and just sloughed off, that guides him in his actions and his thoughts  -  the same grace that guides and shapes us and directs us as people who have known the presence and the love of the One we know as Christ?!  The grace that’s ours in the life of the One who receives a woman caught unfaithful and rather than condemning, honours and restores her to a better life; the One who hears the pleading of the beggar Bartimaeus, and gives him sight; who honours the Centurion and the Levite and Samaritan  -  all of them disparaged in their day; the One who ensures the safety of his mother in his final hours; the One who says, “Forgive them, for they know not what they do.”

 

Or the grace that’s ours in the life of the likes of Martin Luther King, Jr., 

or Nelson Mandela, or Florence Nightingale, or Julien Gingras and all the faithful, gracious people like him  - 

one by one ..

 

Once we’ve seen it and we’ve known it, we just can’t go back .. 

 

As the hymn says:  Once you’ve experienced it .. 

 

We’re met these days with resistance to the truth.  We’re met with strong appeals to common sense and to tradition; to status quo and law and order. But we can’t just get quite free of the grace that is of Christ, who calls us into life; whose life appeals to us to challenge common sense and status quo and the way things are; who confronts us with ourselves in saying:

 

To what can I compare this generation?  They are like children sitting in the marketplaces and calling out to others:

         “We played the pipe for you,
          and you did not dance;
          we sang a dirge,
          and you did not mourn.”

 

Those children in the marketplaces called to Jesus to conform; to be like them; to settle in, and settle down.  But Christ Jesus calls for change, for life, for life made new.  Some will pipe, and some will sing  -  the tune of common sense and status quo, and many will respond.  But some will stand and gather up their new commitments and their hopes, and choose to bear the burden of their choice that offers life and hope and grace and life made new! 

And to all of these Christ says:

 

        Come unto me, all you that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.  Take my yoke upon you, and               learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and you shall find rest unto your souls.  For my yoke is easy, and           my burden is light.

 

The burden of commitment that is life-giving is made light with Christ beside us and with us in Christ’s will for every person; with us in that will which solidly is love  -  the love in grace we know and share to change the world.  And once we’ve seen it and we’ve felt it and we’ve been changed by it, there’s no turning back.  As the hymnist says:           Once you’ve experienced it: you spread God’s love to everyone, 

         you want to pass it on.

        This is the promise of the Gospel;

        this is the Good News that we share;

        the Good News that brings life to all the world.

        Thanks be to God!

 

It Only Takes a Spark. Hymn #289

1       It only takes a spark to get a fire going,

        and soon all those around can warm up in its glowing:

        that's how it is with God's love,

        once you've experienced it:

        you spread God's love to everyone,

        you want to pass it on.

 

2      What a wondrous time is spring when all the trees are budding,

        the birds begin to sing, the flowers start their blooming;

        that's how it is with God's love,

        once you've experienced it:

        you want to sing, it's fresh like spring,

        you want to pass it on.

 

3       I wish for you, my friend, this happiness that I've found -

         on God you can depend, it matters not where you're bound;

         I'll shout it from the mountain top;

         I want my world to know:

         the Lord of love has come to me,

          I want to pass it on.

 

Commissioning and Benediction:

(from “Walk Worthy”)

Grace and peace to you from God our Father

and the Risen Lord, Christ Jesus.

Go in peace.

Give your hearts to God.

Live always bearing fruit for him.

Be strengthened by his might 

to ever walk worthy of the Risen Lord.

Amen.

 

Postlude  -  Love Divine, All Loves Excelling

Bible Readings for July 5, 2020

Genesis 24:34-38, 42-49, 58-67 (Jewish Study Bible)

34    [To Rebekah and her brother, Laban,] the man [who had met Rebekah at the wellspring] said, “I am Abraham’s          servant.

35   The Lord has greatly blessed my master, and he has become rich: the Lord has given him sheep and cattle,                  silver and gold, male and female slaves, camels and donkeys.

36   And Sarah, my master’s wife, bore my master a son in her old age, and he has assigned to him everything

       he owns.

37    Now my master made me swear, saying, ‘You shall not get a wife for my son from the daughters of the                        Canaanites, in whose land I dwell;

38   but you shall go to my father’s house, to my kindred, and get a wife for my son.’ 

42  “I came today to the wellspring, and I said, ‘O Lord, God of my master Abraham, if you would indeed grant                  success to the errand on which I am engaged!

43   As I stand by the spring of water, let the young woman who comes out to draw and to whom I say, “Please, let            me drink a little water from your jar,”

44   and who answers, “You may drink, and I will also draw for your camels”—let her be the wife whom the Lord has        decreed for my master’s son.’

45   “I had scarcely finished praying in my heart, when Rebekah came out with her jar on her shoulder, and went               down to the spring and drew.  And I said to her, ‘Please give me a drink.’

46    She quickly lowered her jar  and said, ‘Drink, and I will also water your camels.’  So I drank, and she also                     watered the camels.

47    I inquired of her, ‘Whose daughter are you?’ And she said, ‘The daughter of Bethuel, son of Nahor son, whom            Milcah bore to him.’  And I put the ring on her nose, and the bands on her arms.

48   Then I bowed low in homage to the Lord, and blessed the Lord, the God of my master Abraham, who led me on        the right way to get the daughter of my master’s brother for his son.

49   And now, if you mean to treat my master with true kindness, tell me; and if not, tell me also, that I may turn              right or left.”

58   They called Rebekah and said to her, “Will you go with this man?”  And she said, “I will.”

59   So they sent off their sister Rebekah and her nurse along with Abraham’s servant and his men.

60   And they blessed Rebekah and said to her,

       “O sister!  May you grow into thousands of myriads;
       may your offspring seize
       the gates of their foes.”

61   Then Rebekah and her maids arose, mounted the camels, and followed the man.  So the servant took Rebekah,          and went his way.

62   Isaac had just come back from the vicinity of Beer-lahai-roi, for he was settled in the region of the Negeb.

63   And Isaac went out walking in the field toward evening and, looking up, he saw camels approaching.

64   Raising her eyes, Rebekah saw Isaac.  She alighted from the camel,

65    and said to the servant, “Who is that man walking in the field toward us?”  And the servant said, “It is my                    master.” So she took her veil and covered herself.

66  The servant told Isaac all the things that he had done.

67   Isaac then brought her into the tent of his mother Sarah, and he took Rebekah as his wife.  Isaac loved her, and          thus found comfort after his mother’s death.

Psalm 45:10-17   (Jewish Study Bible*)

For the leader; on shoshannim.  Of the Korahites.

A maskil.  A love song

10   Take heed, lass, and note, incline your ear;
       forget your people and your father’s house,
11    and let the king be aroused by your beauty;
       since he is your lord, bow to him;
12   O Tyrian lass,

       the wealthiest people will court your favour with gifts,    

13   goods of all sorts.

      The royal princess,

       her dress embroidered with golden mountings,

 14  is led inside to the king;

       maidens in her train, her companions,

       are presented to you.

15    They are led in with joy and gladness;
       they enter the palace of the king.

16   Your sons will succeed your ancestors; 

       you will appoint them princes throughout the land. 

17    I commemorate your fame for all generations;
       so peoples will praise you forever and ever.

 

*the verses in this passage are numbered according to the Christian Bible; the Jewish Bible assigns a verse number to the introductory assignation (making verse 10 in the Christian Bible verse 11 in the Jewish Bible)

 

 

Song of Solomon (The Song of Songs) 2:8-13   (New International Version) 

 

8    Listen!  My beloved!
       Look!  Here he comes,
       leaping across the mountains,
       bounding over the hills.
9     My beloved is like a gazelle or a young stag.
       Look!  There he stands behind our wall,
       gazing through the windows,
       peering through the lattice.
10   My beloved spoke and said to me,
       “Arise, my darling,
       my beautiful one, come with me.
11   See!  The winter is past;
      the rains are over and gone.
12   Flowers appear on the earth;
       the season of singing has come,
       the cooing of doves
       is heard in our land.
13    The fig tree forms its early fruit;
       the blossoming vines spread their fragrance.
       Arise, come, my darling;
       my beautiful one, come with me.”

 

Romans 7:15-25a  (Revised Standard and New International Versions)

15    I do not understand my own actions.  For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate.

16    Now if I do what I do not want, I agree that the law is good.

17    So then it is no longer I that do it, but sin which dwells within me.

18   For I know that nothing good dwells within me, that is, in my flesh.  I can will what is right, but I cannot do it.

19   For I do not do the good I want, but the evil I do not want is what I do.

20  Now if I do what I do not want, it is no longer I that do it, but sin which dwells within me.

21   So I find it to be a law that when I want to do right, evil lies close at hand.

22   For I delight in the law of God, in my inmost self,

23   but I see another law at work in me, waging war against the law of my mind and making me a prisoner of the            law of sin at work within me.

24   What a wretched man I am!  Who will deliver me from this body of death?

25   Thanks be to God, who delivers me through Jesus Christ our Lord! 

 

Matthew 11:16-19, 25-30  (New International and King James Versions)

16   “To what can I compare this generation?  They are like children sitting in the marketplaces and calling

       out to others:

17    "We played the pipe for you,
       and you did not dance;
       we sang a dirge,
       and you did not mourn.’

18    For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, ‘He has a demon.’

19    The Son of Man came eating and drinking, and they say, ‘Here is a glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax                     collectors and sinners.’ But wisdom is proved right by her deeds.”  [God's wisdom, however, is shown to be                 true by its results. (GNT)]

 

25   At that time Jesus said, “I.  praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things          from the wise and learned, and revealed them to little children.

26   Yes, Father, for this is what you were pleased to do.

27    “All things have been committed to me by my Father.  No one knows the Son except the Father, and no one                knows the Father except the Son and those to whom the Son chooses to reveal him.

28   Come unto me, all you that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.

29   Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and you shall find rest unto

       your souls.

30  For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.

Morning Prayer                           

Loving God, in whom we live and move,  and have our very being: we thank you for the heartbeat and the heartache of your Son, the One we know as Saviour and as Friend, who has lived with us, and lives within us and among us still.  We thank you that, despite the heartache and the hardships of our days and times, our lives are deeply held and guided by a grace too deep for words, a grace that awards with deepened wisdom and with living new horizons we could never have imagined on our own. 

 

We thank you for the presence of the Spirit, who sheds your light of love across inertia and confusion, and enlivens life’s commitments to the cause of life for all.  “Thy kingdom come,” we pray, and in the strong compassion of your presence, we can recognize our place in bringing answer.  God of Life, of daily new creation, guide us in your love and in your ways of life for all.  We pray in Jesus’ name.

 

And gracious Saviour hear the prayers we join with those of others.  We pray for family, friend and neighbour, near and far, whose lives have been upended by the devastating impact of pandemic.  Help us all to take our place: in making those concessions that are needed; in forgoing privileges and pleasures that would increase another’s burdens and don’t contribute to relief; in our support and being resource to those initiatives that bring help and hope and healing to a reeling world.  We join our prayers with those of others seeking equal justice and respect for every person, regardless of what we’ve come to call their race or creed or colour, their sexual identity, their politics or birthright, their so-called social status or their bank book.  Help us always seek your face in our fellow beings, and treat each other as we would family or guest. We pray enlightened evidence will shape the course of police services everywhere, in every civilized population, and that our views of values and traditions might benefit significantly from modern viewpoints and perspectives, and from valued, different voices so seldomly regarded. 

 

We join our prayers with family, friend and neighbour, near and far, long-time or just new, who are wrestling with ill health and worries, regimens and tests and test results, faith and hope and confidence in life.  Draw us close to one another in our prayers, and close to you, and assure us in our souls that we are one with you, healed, together, and made whole, and that our daily lives are held in love and purpose, so we can live life fully to the end and in the promise, then, of being welcomed home by you. 

 

Gracious Saviour, hear our prayers: spoken ones and silent ones, and ones just barely formed; and help us know your answer.  Dear Lord, we pray for peace; and all in Jesus’ name.  Amen.        

Trinity United Church Thorold 

905-227-4644  /  tuc@vaxxine.ca